Archive for Predictive Programming

Minority Report” Technology To Become Reality By 2020

Posted in News, Surveillance, Technology with tags , , , , on November 27, 2016 by realizethelies

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According to a new report by Juniper Research, the largely “point and click” style computer and Internet interactions with which humans have become so familiar are going to enter a paradigm shift in the coming years.
By the beginning of the next decade, humans will largely interface with online (and offline) electronics via physical actions and gestures reminiscent of the 2002 science fiction film, Minority Report.

Juniper Research asserts that by 2020, “There will be as many as 492 million motion and gesture-tracking devices.” This incredible 280% increase suggests “gesture and motion control will become vital for certain forms of human-computer interaction in the coming years.”

In Minority Report, which is based on a 1956 science fiction short story by Philip K. Dick. Police Chief John Anderton’s PreCrime division sources future info from specially harvested humans. These so called “PreCogs” possess extrasensory perception,which they use to feed into a computerized “pre -crime” database.
In the film the protagonist accesses a vast gesture based user interface,not much unlike the developing gesture based camera’s and V.R. systems of today.

According to Juniper’s new Gesture, Motion & Haptics interface research, in only a few years most Web users will be handling information this way. Interestingly, traditional devices, like PCs and even smartphones, are not expected to adopt gesture and motion control with anywhere near the same frequency.
The innovation expected to spearhead the change is virtual reality. Virtual reality headsets and wearables such as smart watches and glasses are uniquely suited to integrate motion and gesture tracking.

The precognitive policing of Minority Report could become reality, too. The technology of 2020 probably won’t include ‘PreCogs’ floating in water and generating dream-visions of the next murder, but there are some analysts who think nation-states will wield complex predictive crime programs in the near future. And some manifestations of this technology exist now. But will these nascent technologies mature to be full-blown PreCrime divisions?

Original Story Here

Philip K. Dick Warned Us About the Internet of Things in 1969

Posted in Surveillance, Technology with tags , , , , on February 20, 2015 by realizethelies

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Be careful about what you say in your living room if your new TV is on. News broke earlier this week that Samsung’s Web-connected SmartTV can listen to, record, and send what the television hears to a third-party company. The television doesn’t watch you watch it back, but it is listening.

Sci-fi great Philip K. Dick warned us about this decades ago. In his classic 1969 novel Ubik, the characters have to negotiate the way they move and how they communicate with inanimate objects that monitor them, lock them out, and force payments.

In this passage from Ubik, a man is actually locked out by a door that requires a mandatory payment to open. And when he grabs a tool to disassemble the doorknob, the door threatens him with a lawsuit for violating his user contract. It’s prescient, to say the least.

The door refused to open. It said, “Five cents, please.”

He searched his pockets. No more coins; nothing. “I’ll pay you tomorrow,” he told the door. Again it remained locked tight. “What I pay you,” he informed it, “is in the nature of a gratuity; I don’t have to pay you.”

“I think otherwise,” the door said. “Look in the purchase contract you signed when you bought this conapt.”

…he found the contract. Sure enough; payment to his door for opening and shutting constituted a mandatory fee. Not a tip.

“You discover I’m right,” the door said. It sounded smug.

Here’s one of the problems: Although we agree to terms of service agreements when we use digital products, way more often than not, we don’t read them. They tend to be long and full of legalese, yet these contracts often contain important information about the need to turn off features that, when left on, may overstep the intended purpose of the product. Like a TV that records your private living room conversations, for example.

Samsung isn’t alone. In 2013, an LG Web–connected TV was found to be collecting users’ viewing data. It’s not like Samsung is the federal government, but by now we all know how readily tech companies may hand over user information to law enforcement when presented with a subpoena.

When our devices do things we didn’t realize we signed up for, the potential for exploitative practices expands. Maybe we should listen closer to predictive science fiction. Imagine if the door in Ubik were a refrigerator door that refused to open? What then?

Original Article Here

Predictive Programming?: Attack on Syria and WW3

Posted in Conspiracy, Social Engineering with tags , , , , , on September 10, 2013 by realizethelies

The following clip is from the 2006 film “Southland Tales”. which depicts an Alternative timeline history where twin nuclear attacks have sent America into World War III. In the wake of the attacks The Patriot Act has expanded(sound familiar-NDAA) and a new homeland security type dictatorship is instituted which keeps constant tabs on citizens—even to the extent of censoring the Internet and using fingerprints in order to access computers and bank accounts.

Is it coincidence that we have the framework of a police state fascist dictatorship being built in this country, while at the same time pushing to engage in a 4th War/Military action in the past 12 years, which could at this point develop in to World War 3?

Via Zen Gardener

Google, CIA Invest in ‘Future’ of Web Monitoring

Posted in C.I.A., N.S.A, News, Surveillance with tags , , , on June 20, 2013 by realizethelies

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The investment arms of the CIA and Google are both backing a company that monitors the web in real time — and says it uses that information to predict the future.

The company is called Recorded Future, and it scours tens of thousands of websites, blogs and Twitter accounts to find the relationships between people, organizations, actions and incidents — both present and still-to-come. In a white paper, the company says its temporal analytics engine “goes beyond search” by “looking at the ‘invisible links’ between documents that talk about the same, or related, entities and events.”

The idea is to figure out for each incident who was involved, where it happened and when it might go down. Recorded Future then plots that chatter, showing online “momentum” for any given event.
(the best parts of Pre-Crime and Predictive programming all rolled into one)

It’s not the very first time Google has done business with America’s spy agencies. Long before it reportedly enlisted the help of the National Security Agency to secure its networks, Google sold equipment to the secret signals-intelligence group. In-Q-Tel backed the mapping firm Keyhole, which was bought by Google in 2004 — and then became the backbone for Google Earth.

Original Article: Wired, Danger Room