Indefinite Surveillance :NDAA 2014

Ndaaflag

Remember Indefinite Detention? Now There’s Indefinite Surveillance in the NDAA: 2014

Earlier this month, the House of Representatives voted on the National Defense Authorization Act of 2013 (NDAA), which includes a provision to indefinitely detain United States citizens without charge or a fair trial.When the House voted on 2012’s NDAA in December of 2011, it unanimously passed and President Obama signed the bill into law on the second of January.

As if the looming possibility of being indefinitely detained without charge or trial isn’t enough of a violation of civil liberties, now the 2014 NDAA is looking like it’ll focus much on surveillance gathering thanks to the Patriot Act and FISA.

Last month, the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Emerging Threats and Capabilities gathered to examine the fiscal year 2014 NDAA. Section 1061, which is known as the Enhancement of Capacity of the United States Government to Analyze Captured Records, was one of the focused topics during the meeting. It would act as a provision to the NDAA to develop a brand-new intelligence body, which would be able to scrutinize data collected through the Patriot Act, FISA, and other spying programs like the infamous PRISM, which was involved in a scandal that many now believe was a complete violation of the Fourth Amendment.

Original Story Here

Indefinte Detention of U.S. citizens continues, with House vote (Thanks Politicians..!)

ndaatest

The U.S. House of Representatives voted again Thursday to allow the indefinite military detention of Americans, blocking an amendment that would have barred the possibility.

Congress wrote that authority into law in the National Defense Authorization Act two years ago, prompting outrage from civil libertarians on the left and right.

Supporters of detention argue that the nation needs to be able to arrest and jail suspected terrorists without trial, including Americans on U.S. soil, for as long as there is a war on terror. Their argument won, and the measure was defeated by a vote of 200 to 226. opponents, among them the Rep. Adam Smith (D-Wash.), who offered the amendment to end that authority, argued that such detention is a stain on the Constitution that unnecessarily militarizes U.S. law enforcement.

“It is a dangerous step toward executive and military power to allow things like indefinite detention under military control within the U.S.,” Smith said. “That’s the heart and essence of this issue.”

Original Article Here